How To Make Carbonated Kombucha
The Secondary Fermentation

 

What is Carbonation?

Carbonation is Carbon Dioxide dissolving into liquid that is under pressure (Sealed Container), carbonation occurs when pressure is released.

What causes Carbonation?

There are 2 ways this happens the natural and the man-made or Forced carbonation.Natural carbonation occurs during fermentation and a sealed container.
And Force Carbonation is adding Carbon Dioxide while a liquid is under pressure.

Bubbles during first fermentation are perfectly normal,This happens because the new kombucha culture or (s.c.o.b.y) formed a seal from the air outside.Although it isnt the fizz you are looking for, its a small amount of carbonation. The second fermentation is where all the magic happens.

Why isn't my Kombucha fizzy like the bottled stuff?

Grape Kombucha

If you'd like to enjoy your kombucha with some fizz, but don't want the bottled stuff, follow these easy steps once you feel you've mastered the first stage of fermenting.

First you need to understand the carbonation or effervescence happens during the SECONDARY FERMENTATION. Secondary fermentation is also a great opportunity to add flavor to your kombucha. We recommend dried cherries, ginger or ANY dried fruit really, experiment with flavors and find your favorite flavored kombucha. For suggestions, check out our kombucha recipe page.


Secondary Fermentation:

Raspberry kombucha

* Strain the kombucha tea separating the scoby.(aka kombucha mushroom, culture)

* Save a 1/2 cup of kombucha tea for your next batch !  Set Aside
* Place your strained kombucha tea in an airtight bottle and let sit .


Once bottled allow the kombucha to remain out at room temperature for 24 to 72 hours or longer, depending on your kombucha and ambient temperature. I usually pick one bottle to test for carbonation. Be careful because the other bottles will be still fizzier since you will be opening the same one and releasing some of the carbonation. I have had bottles nearly explode after just three days, so test daily and make sure you are careful when opening.

When the carbonation and tartness/taste are to your liking, simply refrigerate your brew! Be aware that refrigeration will slow

fermentation, but it will still occur - so if you drink your kombucha over months instead of days or weeks, be sure to release the pressure and excess carbonation every few weeks, and realize that it will continue to consume sugar and grow more tart, even vinegary, over time.

You may have a small, thin scoby growing at the top surface of the kombucha in the bottle. If this bothers you, pour the kombucha through a mesh strainer before drinking.

*Be cautious when opening your container. We recommend you open it over a sink to avoid spillage.